5 Best Bitcoin Mining Hardware ASIC Machines (2020 Rigs)

Avalon ASIC Bitcoin Miner Batch #2 Black IN HAND (North America) RARE

Avalon ASIC Bitcoin Miner Batch #2 Black IN HAND (North America) RARE submitted by mco65 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Canaan's new ASIC is a Pipe Dream, not an Ethereum Threat

So, yesterday Kristy-Leigh Minehan posted on Twitter that a company named Canaan announced an ASIC that is capable of 0.68W/Mhs
That's 2200Mh/s running at 1500w
https://twitter.com/OhGodAGirl/status/1176938519866089473
Here is a list of how it compares to other ASICs and GPUs.
https://blog.miningstore.com/blog/ethereum-mining-hardware-for-2019
She used this tweet to promote the need for ProgPoW
Today, I am attempting to explain that Canaan is not a threat to centralize Ethereum mining with their ASICs.
First, I cannot find any information regarding Canaan announcing an Ethereum ASIC other than Kristy's twitter post
There is only one article written about it and it uses Kristy's twitter post as their source.
https://cryptoslate.com/ethereum-asic-dominates-gpu-performance/
Nothing on Canaan's website talks about this miner
Nor does Canaan's twitter account mention anything like this.
If we look closely at Kristy's twitter picture, you can see the Canaan Ethereum miner will be called the V10.
I cannot find any info anywhere on this miner.
You would think that if Canaan is unveiling a new product, they would be talking about it more to spread awareness and raise hype, but they aren't.
I mean, they made a big to-do when they announced the A10 bitcoin miner in March, so why are they posting nothing about the V10 ethereum miner.
https://twitter.com/canaanio/status/1111513725733724160
And a google search will show many many more articles written about the bitcoin A10 after its announcement.
I'm not saying the announcement isn't real, just that I find it odd that the company isn't talking about it themselves.
Canaan did respond to a tweet from “cryptoState”, the writer's of the article based on Kristy's tweet.
Canaan replied that the v10 is not an official worldwide Canaan product.
https://twitter.com/canaanio/status/1177088253431668736
and further in the cryptostate article, Canaan says “It is a little hard to explain, but those are not products designed and built by Canaan engineering. They are products sold by the domestic sales team and are not an official worldwide Canaan product,”
I do not know what that means exactly. If it means it's not an official Canaan product, or that it won't be available worldwide, or what.
But this is the first clue to me that it isn't anything to worry about.
If it's not an official Canaan product, then it doesn't seem like it will have support from Canaan to bring it to market.
It won't be marketed by Canaan, use it's supply chain, it's business resources and contacts, use it's support system, or be built by Canaan.
Next, yes 0.68W/Mhs is more efficient than GPUs, but that isn't all that matters when miners choose the devices to use.
What matters also is how much the machine costs.
If the V10 is price too high, then it's not something to worry about.
Without a price, Kristy can't claim in good faith that the V10 is something Ethereum needs to worry about and a reason ProgPoW needs to be adopted.
I'm not sure how to price the thing, myself, but at current ETH prices and hashrate, it would make $2200 in 4 months.
I think generally ASIC mfgs price their machines to break even in 3-4 months.
So that would be the machine will cost around $2200.
BUT, that's only if ONE machine is running on the network.
The more machines on the network, the less profitable they are.
If we look at the Avalon A1066, it's november batch costs $1390, and has a break-even time of 464 months at current bitcoin prices.
So it seems to me the Canaan V10 will be quite a bit more expensive than $2200.
Which doesn't make it feasible for that many people to buy.
Next, there was no product on display at the New Era Mining Summit, where this product was announced.
Only some graphics of numbers they claim.
Nor can I find any technical documentation talking about how they plan to achieve the advertised hashrate
I tweeted Kristy telling her that this seems, at best, like just an idea to me, to help them raise money and that it takes more than an idea to bring an ASIC to market.
https://twitter.com/AltcoinXP/status/1177290387205054464
Kristy then blocked me on Twitter and told me to stop spreading misinformation.
https://imgur.com/lWEAWbd
So, now let's talk about the article I replied to her with, claiming that Canaan doesn't have enough funding for this.
Granted, I said this without doing as much research as I could've, but let's see if what I said holds true.
Here is the article I linked in the tweet.
https://www.coindesk.com/avalon-bitcoin-miner-maker-canaan-is-plotting-another-ipo-attempt
Notice the date this article was published. March 27th 2019.
Notice that Avalon announce their Bitcoin A10 miner the next day.
https://twitter.com/canaanio/status/1111513725733724160
Perhaps to help attract funding from new investors, which the Coindesk article says they haven't been able to bring on any new investors in a long time.
I'm not going to cite the whole article here, read it for yourself, but it generally explains that Canaan is unable to attract new funding.
Also, Xianfu Lui, a 17.2% shareholder in Canaan left the company in February, so I doubt he invested money into Canaan.
https://www.coindesk.com/co-founder-quits-avalon-mining-chip-maker-canaan-over-differences
Here are some more Coindesk articles speaking about Canaan trying to raise money.
https://www.coindesk.com/huobi-plans-backdoor-ipo-attempt-in-hong-kong-document-suggests
“After mining giant Bitmain’s IPO attempt in Hong Kong was allowed to expire, apparently due to reluctance from HKEX, it’s reportedly now planning to list in the U.S. Another miner manufacturer, Canaan Creative, is also reported to have already confidentially filed in the U.S. after a failed HKEX attempt. “
https://www.coindesk.com/bitcoin-miner-maker-canaan-confidentially-files-for-ipo-in-us-report
https://www.coindesk.com/bitcoin-miner-canaans-ipo-likely-delayed-after-hong-kong-filing-expires
“The Reuters report, citing anonymous sources, further said the HKEX and financial regulators in Hong Kong have raised questions over Canaan’s business model, given the volatile nature of cryptocurrencies. As such, the news agency said the IPO might not go ahead this year, since there have been no updates from a listing hearing with the HKEX. “
So seems to be Caanan is having a hard time finding funding for their endeavors. Pretty much every single article on Coindesk about them is about them trying to get funding and failing at it.
So do they have enough money to bring the V10 to market AND bring enough V10s to be a problem?
They would need to produce 45,000 units to get 50% of the Ethereum mining power.
Current network is 197TH/s https://bitinfocharts.com/ethereum/
Currently Bitmain is estimated to have produced less than 20,000 units since the Antminer E3's announcement in April 2018.
https://www.reddit.com/ethereum/comments/d8fuvj/an_argument_against_progpow_a_day_part_1/f1axc2c/
https://www.coindesk.com/bitmain-confirms-release-first-ever-ethereum-asic-miners
Bitmain being a much larger company than Canaan, it seems unlikely they will produce 45,000 units quick enough to become a problem.
Anyway,
For those of you that don't know, Canaan manages the Avalon bitcoin ASICs and have done so since 2014. Canaan is fulling in charge of Avalon.
https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Avalon
Maybe I should've said that sooner, I don't know. I'm just typing as I come up with stuff.
But we can look at Avalon's bitcoin past to determine what the future ethereum miner supply might look like. Keep in mind though, this was also during a time when they were well-funded.
I'm not sure what their bank account looks like now, but they have been in the red every year since their existance, so I have to assume they have less money now than when they were releasing bitcoin miners
Avalon announce the A10 March 2019, and started shipping pre-orders in October 2019.
If the V10 follows suit, we won't see a V10 in the hands of miners until April 2020
https://www.coindesk.com/demand-for-new-bitcoin-miners-is-again-outstripping-supply
Ok, I'm done. That's all I put together and why I don't believe the Canaan ASIC that was announced is a concern warranting the immediate adoption of ProgPoW
Thanks for reading.
submitted by Anthony-AltcoinXP to ethereum [link] [comments]

Addressing the many concerns related to Obelisk

Why make ASICs at all?

Our blog has a longer post on the subject, but the ultimate answer is that GPU mining is very insecure. For the vast majority of GPU mined coins out there (including Sia), it is the case that there are multiple, if not many, individuals who operate enough GPUs to execute a 51% attack against the coin all by themselves. There are some very large Ethereum GPU farms out there, and they are a threat to all small GPU-mined coins. (our market cap is a factor of 50 smaller than Ethereum - we are a small coin). And it's not just Ethereum farms to be afraid of, there are massive GPU farms dedicated to machine learning as well, and other big-data related use cases. All of those are potential sources for a 51% attack. Even worse, if the price of the coin tanks following such an attack, the attacker has nothing to lose, because the core purpose of their hardware is unrelated to Sia, and unaffected by a change in price.
Though it sounds terrible and unintuitive, a single centralized entity running ASICs would be a much more secure situation than this. Because with a single central ASIC entity, you get two huge advantages:
  1. There's only 1 entity capable of performing a 51% attack. This is much better than having multiple entities that are each individually capable of performing a 51% attack.
  2. If the price of the coin falls, the entity that has all of the hardware loses a lot of money. That hardware isn't good for anything besides Sia mining, so that entity is quite invested in propping up the siacoin price.
We chose ASICs over GPUs because even the worst case scenario is more secure and better for the coin than the situation with GPU mining.
But we also did not want a single entity owning and operating all of the ASICs. That's when we realized, if we were ASIC manufacturers ourselves, we could guarantee that at least one entity is selling chips to the larger community. The unfortunate fact is that either way, there is going to be a small number of chip manufacturers who have the power to sell chips to the community. Even so, this is a better situation than what you get with GPU mining.
We are making ASICs so that we can guarantee the first batch of ASICs will make it to the Sia community. Without that, we have no idea if the first batch of ASICs will be sold to the public or hoarded by some greedy investors who were able to pay the full price of manufacturing up-front.

Why are you doing the presale so early?

We, put simply, don't have enough cash even to do the early development of the chips. We need financing to pay for chip development.
Traditionally, we would find some private investors, have them front some millions, and in return promise them a very good deal on some hardware. The private investors would get the first stab at buying ASICs, they'd get a huge chunk, and they'd get them at an exclusive deal for taking on the risk early. We actually had private investors come forward offering this to us, with enough money to fund the full development and manufacture of the first batch of chips - this isn't a hypothetical, it's a real offer that the Sia team received.
This didn't seem fair to us. When we finally did get to the point where the miners were ready to be sold to the community, we would have to offer the community a worse deal. Less risky, but ultimately it would mean that the community was excluded from the opportunity of participating early, and the result is a huge chunk of the chips going to some private investors.
Such a situation is still better than GPU mining, but it didn't seem like the best that we could do. We felt that we could do better by opening the early presale to everyone.

Why not accept credit cards?

Payment processors are not friendly to Bitcoin products. We contacted Stripe and were told point-blank that they would not process payments for cryptocurrency miners. We appreciate everyone who pointed us towards Stripe as a bitcoin-friendly company, but they gave us a direct no.
Paypal has a long history of freezing merchant accounts with little warning, and when they do so they freeze your existing money in addition to freezing incoming payments - we would be unable to pay our bills if Paypal did this to us, and it would unquestionably cause delays. Visa and MasterCard are not much better in terms of track record.
Losing access to our accounts would unquestionably cause delays. ASIC hardware is already well known to suffer from serious delays, and we need to limit our exposure to delays.
We are in an industry that is unfortunately fraught with fraud. With revenue-generated devices such as miners, criminals are much more likely to try to target these devices as a way to cash in on stolen credit cards, stolen identities, hacked bank accounts, etc. The fraud rates are staggering, and as a result most payment processors outright refuse to deal with it. We are aware that Bitmain is partnered with Paypal, though we don't know the details behind how that came to be.

Why not accept Siacoin?

This was a harder decision. We could quite easily choose to accept siacoin, however we fear that Siacoin is not ready to handle such a massive presale. The market cap and daily volume of Bitcoin is a factor of 100 times as large as the Siacoin market cap and volume. Moving millions or tens of millions of dollars through Bitcoin is not likely to make much of a dent. Siacoin on the other hand, a sudden sell order for millions of dollars would likely tank the price. That not only means the ecosystem is unhappy with us, it also means that we might only be able to sell $2499 of siacoin for $2200.
A lot of people have accused us of not having confidence in our own coin. Unfortunately, this is true. Even at a $500 million market cap, Sia is not ready to handle a presale of this size. It's a pragmatic decision based on the fact that we don't want to dump our own coin. We know that people will be selling siacoin to buy the miners anyway, but we still feel that this situation is much better than us accepting siacoin directly.
This decision was a disappointment for us as well. We would love to accept siacoin, and if we weren't talking about processing millions of dollars in a single day, we absolutely would be accepting siacoin. And, as Sia continues growing up, the concerns above will become less and less.

What about this 5% gains/losses stuff?

Our intention was never to play fishy financial games with our users, and honestly this isn't even something that crossed our minds as a potential problem point. I think a big part of the issue was that people did not realize we will be converting to US dollars as fast as possible - we will be doing the conversion in minutes or hours as long as we can keep up with the order volume.
The rationale is very simple. If the price plummets before we are able to convert the Bitcoin, we won't have enough money to create the hardware. We really don't expect this to matter, because we don't expect the price to swing by more than $100 (which is what would be required) in the few hours that we're going to be sitting on the BTC. If it does, we'll need more coins or we can't produce the hardware - our costs are in dollars, which means we need to end up with the right amount of dollars in our account at the end of the day.
The original stance on not returning gains was also very simple. There's no transparency into when we sell the coins. If we sell the coins within 60 minutes of receiving them, and then 4 hours later there's a huge surge in the price, we will almost certainly have users emailing us and posting about how we owe them a refund. We won't have that refund, because we'll have sold the coins before the price rise.
There's not much we can do to provide transparency into this either. And we're likely to get requests for refunds even if it takes 3 months for Bitcoin to rise by 5%. This promise of returning gains that we've put forward is going to be a massive headache, because we're not expecting to have any gains, even if the price goes up by that much we'll have likely converted to USD faster than that. Our whole goal is to convert to USD as fast as possible.
We're sorry that we have to go through this headache at all. If we could get set up with a processor like Stripe, we could accept both Bitcoin and USD and let them deal with the conversion process, slippage risk, and all the other headache associated with using multiple currencies.

Why shipping a full 12 months away?

Before we set out to make Sia miners, we did a study of companies who had previously sold and pre-sold Bitcoin miners. This included talking to both Avalon and Butterfly Labs, and talking to professionals and advisors who have shipped hardware successfully in other industries. The core piece of advice we got was pretty consistent: expect delays. Expect lots of delays, and expect them to come from the most absurd setbacks. (Example: one of the people we talked to had to delay their product because there was a global shortage of power supplies, and they had to wait in line behind billion dollar companies to get some).
Our projections indicate that if all goes well, we should be able to ship the miners in 6-8 months. Nothing we are doing is new. Plenty of companies have gone through the process of developing a chip, manufacturing it, putting it in a box, and then shipping it to users. There is almost no innovation risk here. Sia's PoW algorithm is deliberately very ASIC friendly, even more than Bitcoin. We have advisors who have gone through this process before, and the types of challenges facing us are well known.
6-8 months is reasonable, except that every single person we've talked to has told us that unexpected delays is a guarantee, and that by nature of being unexpected, there's not really any way to prevent them by planning around them. Delays are just inherent to shipping hardware. So we chose to set our target at 12 months.
We will ship the miners as soon as they are ready. If we are a few months ahead of schedule, and have somehow managed to avoid the foretold delays, we will ship them months ahead of schedule. But we want our users to have a realistic understanding of the expected delays. We've baked a generous amount of time for setbacks into our shipping date. We'll almost certainly need at least some of it.

Why $2499?

Making chips is very expensive. We have to sell thousands of units to cover the cost of the chips. A nontrivial percentage of the price is going to go towards chassis, shipping, power supply, control board, fans, etc. Those costs are relatively the same even if we put in fewer chips, which means the total percentage of our budget going towards chips drops significantly. If we cut the price in half, we'll have to sell roughly three times as many units to break even on the cost of the chips. If we cut the price in half again, we'd need to sell a completely unreasonable number of units to break even on the cost of the chips. It's unfortunate, but the fixed costs of chip manufacture means that we really need vast majority of the price of the unit to be spent on chips, otherwise we simply won't be able to sell enough units.
There is a second reason as well. As stated in the section above, the industry is plagued by delays an unexpected expenses. We need a healthy budget to plan around potential setbacks, because we've been guaranteed that there will be multiple significant setbacks by those who have gone through this process before. If we bring down the price of the unit, we will also be reducing the amount of wiggle room we have for disaster if suddenly we have to replace parts, re-do designs, or otherwise perform expensive adjustments to our plans.

Are you guys qualified to be working on hardware?

Zach is a mechanical engineer, I've been in the Bitcoin space since before ASICs started shipping, and we have advisors who have successfully shipped hardware before. The team that is designing the chips for the miner has designed chips and shipped chips for Bitcoin miners previously - they are familiar with the whole process, and have done it before. The people in charge of designing the PCB board and other aspects of the miner are also all experienced with their respective tasks. We will be facilitating frequent and strong communications between everyone working on the various components of the miner.
The ultimate answer is that the Sia development team is not qualified to be making this type of hardware. However, the Sia development team is not the team working on the hardware. Most of the heavy lifting is being performed by teams with lots of experience in this industry, including experience that is directly related to cryptocurrency miners.
What we are doing is not new. Dozens of cryptocurrency miners have been created and shipped in the past, and we are not starting from day zero. We have many advantages over the previous rounds of pre-sale cryptocurrency miners, but the biggest is that it's no longer the wild west of hardware design. There is a standard, and there are tried-and-true methods for making reliable cryptocurrency miners. We get to fall back on the mistakes and successes of the many miners that have been built previously, and we will be leaning heavily on teams and people that have direct experience in this field as opposed to doing everything ourselves.

Does this mean that Sia is getting less attention from the developers?

Sia right now has four full time employees. Myself, Zach, Luke, and Johnathan. Zach was hired in June 2017, less than one month ago. He is not a programmer.
Luke and Johnathan will continue with the same responsibilities that they've always had. They helped out a little bit in setting up the website, and in setting up a secure database to process orders + payment information, however the majority of their time has been focused on Sia even as we set up this presale. Going forward, they will be almost entirely uninvolved in Obelisk.
I have had to allocate about 25% of my time to Obelisk. Slightly more this week, due to the PR meltdown we had from the initial announcement. But most of my time is still going towards Sia. Most people know I work over 100 hours per week (some weeks will eclipse 120), and that a quarter of my time is not a small amount.
Zach is closer to 50% Sia, 50% Obelisk at this point. We're expecting that to tone down once the presale is over - much of this time has been spent with banks, with lawyers, with payment processors, and we won't have to do that beyond the initial setup phase. Zach and myself will still be having weekly conversations with every part of the Obelisk supply chain, including the chip designers, chip manufacturers, control board designers, the miner assembly teams, and the fulfillment centers, so even after the presale there will be effort going towards Obelisk.
But nobody on the Sia team is doing chip design, nobody is doing control board design, most of the really heavy work is being done by experienced teams and suppliers that we've found and already spent weeks vetting and verifying. We incorporated Obelisk as a separate company precisely so that Obelisk would eventually have a completely separate team.
And finally, as Obelisk is wholly owned by Nebulous, a successful hardware company does mean revenue and income for the Sia team. Cryptocurrency mining tends to be low margin, so tens of millions in revenue for Obelisk does not necessarily millions in funding for the Sia team. But it is something, and it will give us more time to get the storage platform to the next levels of maturity.

Conclusion

I know that a lot of you are concerned about the miner presale that we are conducting. I hope that this post has helped to alleviate those concerns. I hope it makes sense why we are doing a public presale, instead of seeking private investment until we have a full prototype. I hope this post has clarified our decisions around payment methods, and around our price point. I hope you feel more confident that this is something we will be able to pull off. And finally, I hope I've reassured you guys that Sia is still our primary focus, and that we haven't suddenly pivoted into being a hardware company.
We are ultimately doing this to provide better security to the Sia network. GPU mined coins are frighteningly insecure, and Sia is now large enough where there is serious money on the line. We are doing this to gain security, and also to ensure as much decentralization as possible when it comes to chip manufacture.
We are typically viewed as one of the most reputable teams in cryptocurrency, and I know it's why a lot of you are here. We hope that the Sia ASIC that we are going to be manufacturing and selling strengthens this reputation, but ultimately we will not find out until the miners are actually being shipped.
We continue to be excited about this new product. We truly do feel that ASICs are the right direction for Sia, and we also feel that we are doing the right thing by bringing the opportunity to own a Sia ASIC to the broader Sia community. We are sorry for the fallout from our sloppy original announcement, and we hope that we have since made up for it.
Finally, we hope that you are interested in buying a miner. Even if we only sell a small batch, ASICs are going to utterly dominate the hashrate of Sia going forward. This is an egalitarian sale where everyone has equal opportunity to buy a miner - there's no cap, and we will ensure that small buyers are not shut out by larger buyers in any way.
submitted by Taek42 to siacoin [link] [comments]

Powerful New Ethereum Miner Reaches Final Stage Before Mass Production

Powerful New Ethereum Miner Reaches Final Stage Before Mass Production

https://preview.redd.it/ao78avnae4m31.png?width=860&format=png&auto=webp&s=11f62e6227dc7d93e9a6c2c3874782fcd4892b59
News by Coindesk: Wolfie Zhao
After a nine-month delay and $3.8 million of investment, an upstart manufacturer is ready to produce its first batch of powerful new machines for mining cryptocurrencies ethereum and ethereum classic.
Linzhi, based in Shenzen, China, said Wednesday it had ordered 37 wafers from Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company, the main parts that will allow it to build about 200 application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) miners.
These sample units will test whether the machines can mine as efficiently as they are designed to do using ethash, the proof-of-work algorithm used on ethereum and ethereum classic.
The testing units, if successful, would mark a major step toward mass production as Linzhi sets out to compete with makers of general-purpose computing chips, such as NIVIDA, as well as mining gear specialists Bitmain and InnoSilicon, which both make ASIC miners for the ethash algorithm.
Roughly five million ether (ETH), the native cryptocurrency on the ethereum network, is being mined every year, which, at its current price, is worth more than $800 million. Even for ethereum classic, which maintains the original ethereum ledger from before a hard fork in 2016, about nine million native ETC gets mined every year, worth more than $60 million.

Powerful chips

Linzhi was founded in February 2018 by Chen Min, a former chip design head at Canaan Creative, maker of the Avalon bitcoin miner. Chen told CoinDesk the new company was completely self-funded with about $4 million as starting capital.
It announced the plan to produce ethash ASIC miners in September 2018 with an ambition to beat the efficiency of most existing equipment. Chen’s target specification for Linzhi’s ethash ASIC miner is set at 1400 mega hashes per second (MH/s) with an electricity consumption level of one kilowatt-hour.
To put those figures in perspective, NVIDIA’s GTX TitanV 8 card is now one of the most profitable piece of equipment on the ethash algorithm, able to compute 656 MH/s at an energy consumption level of 2.1 kWh, according to mining pool f2pool’s miner profitability index,
With ETH’s current price ($180) and network difficulty, as well as an electricity cost of $0.04 per kWh, each GTX TitanV 8 would bring home a daily profit of $7.35. Similarly, if one uses the same GTX TitanV 8 card to mine ETC, which has both a lower price and a lower mining difficulty than ETH, the daily profit would still be around $6.70.
The total computing power racing on ethereum and ethereum classic to compete for block rewards and to secure the two networks is around 160 and 13 tera hashes per second (TH/s), respectively.

Plan A

Since the announcement of its plan, Linzhi has spent almost all of its initial capital on research and development of the chip design, the operations of its dozen-person team, and the order of the first batch of wafers, to bet the sample testing units will deliver the intended mining power.
Linzhi previously said it was aiming to order the first batch of wafers around December in order to have samples ready in April and mass production in June.
Speaking of the delay, the company said:
“We underestimated the complexity of the chip and how long it would take to grow the team and make the company functional. We are cautiously optimistic that we can just move forward the rest of the schedule, which would mean 12/2019 for sample machines and 02/2020 for mass production.”
One possible risk for the business is that the ethereum community has previously voted to activate the so-called ProgPow algorithm in order to remove the edge maintained by large miners that can afford expensive, specialized chips, although the timing for that switch is not yet decided. (Eventually, ethereum developers want to transition from proof-of-work to proof-of-stake, which would eliminate mining altogether.)
When asked if Linzhi has any Plan B if the switch happens, Chen said the company is, in fact, more active in the ETC community, adding:
“Our plan A is to focus on ETC mining. So if ETH will still be an option, that’s something good to have. In the ethereum community, the ProgPow plan still has some uncertainty. For the time being, we don’t see it as a market that we will obtain, so I don’t really care that much.”

Reverse discount

In an arguably counterintuitive move, Chen said the company plans to adopt what it calls a “reverse discount” strategy when it starts to take in pre-orders if sample units prove to be successful. That would mean the more you buy, the more you are likely going to pay.
The reason is to discourage any single entity from buying too many machines and thus concentrating power over the network.
While Linzhi has not yet decided on final pricing for each unit to be sold at pre-orders, it says the goal is to achieve a payback period of four months for individual miners with a relatively small number of orders.
“This is our efforts and contribution to the idea of decentralization,” Chen said, concluding:
“Our sales will go to developers and community first, with a focus on geographical distribution, and potentially with a malus [reverse discount] for large orders. This means that small orders by individuals would be priced to hit the 4 month [return of investment] and larger orders would pay more.”
Mining equipment image via CoinDesk archive
submitted by GTE_IO to u/GTE_IO [link] [comments]

Chinese Miners Have Cartelized Chip Production

I rarely see this talked about if at all. Most ASICS since the time of ASICMINER have been produced in some capacity by TSMC. Ignoring NRE costs, which ironically isn't very high in comparison to chip production, most connected Chinese miners can get chips directly from fabrication.
When Avalon started shipping orders, they also shipped wholesale chips at 10,000 a Batch. Each Avalon chip at the time would generate about 0.4 BTC a month. The procurement cost was about 9 bucks per chip. Given it would cost you about 10-15 bucks to rig a single chip into a miner you were looking at a net ROI of about 20-21 bucks per month with increasing difficulty.
More details can be seen here.
Now it costs about $8-$10 per gigahash retail, which given the difficulty increase, and the fact the impact of NRE costs should be going down (given this expense is less impactful to revenue with the more chips you sell as it's a fixed cost), anyone buying a retail miner is getting fleeced.
I have seen less and less direct chip buys, to the point I'm convinced Bitcoin ASIC production has been cartelized.
The Chinese chip producers will effectively push smaller miners out of the market by over pricing hardware sales to the public, while giving their buddies the "at-cost" price.
The demise of KNC miner is due to miner cartelization.
submitted by thestringpuller to btc [link] [comments]

Updated FAQs for newcomers

TL:DR: Don't bother mining if you want to get rich yo. You're way too late to the party.
Welcome to the exciting and often stressful world of bitcoin! You are wondering what looks like a once in a lifetime opportunity to get rich quick. Of course you guys probably heard about this "mining" process but what is this?
Simply put, a bitcoin mining machine that performs complicated calculations and when deemed correct by the network, receives a block which contains 25 bitcoins (XBT). This is how bitcoins are generated. So your brain instantly thinks, "Holy shit, how can I get on this gold rush?"
Before you proceed further, I would like to explain the concept of mining further. Bitcoin is limited 21m in circulation. It is coded to release a certain number of blocks at a certain time frame, ie: this year the network will release close to 500,000 bitcoins. What this means is that the more people (or specifically the amount of mining power) mine, the less each person gets. The network tries to keep to this time frame through the process of difficulty adjustments which makes the calculations harder and this happens every 2 weeks. So every 2 weeks, you get less bitcoins with the same hash rate (mining power) based on what the difficulty changes are. Recently, the changes have been pretty staggering, jumping 226% in 2 months. You can see the difficulty changes here.
Now, why are these changes so large?
A bit of a simple history. Bitcoin's algorithm runs on SHA-256. This algorithm can be solved using many hardware, from CPU to GPU and dedicated hardware (Application Specific Integrated Circuits). When bitcoin first started, mining on CPU was a trivial process, you can pretty much earn 50 XBT (the block size then) every few hours between Q1 and Q2 of 2010.
In late 2010, due to the difficulty increase that is reducing the effectiveness of CPU mining, people started to harness GPU mining. Only AMD GPU's architecture design are better optimized for bitcoin mining so this is what the community used. Immediate improvements of more than 10x was not uncommon.
In time of course, GPUs reached their limit and people started to build dedicated. In the same vein as the CPU to GPU transition, similar performance increase was common. These ASICs can only perform SHA-256 calculation so they can be highly optimized. Their performance mainly depends on the die size of the chips exactly like CPU chips.
In general, think of bitcoin mining's technological advancement no different to mining gold. Gold panning (CPUs) vs pickaxes (GPUs) vs machinery (ASICs) and we are still in the ASIC mining race.
ASIC mining started with ASICMiner and Avalon being first to the market, both producing 130nm and 110nm chips. The technology are antiquated in comparison to CPUs and GPUs which are now 22nm with 14nm slated for Q1 next year by Intel but they are cheap to manufacture and with performance gains similar to the CPU to GPU transition, they were highly successful and popular for early adopters. At that point in time since there were less competing manufacturers and the low batch runs of their products, miners became really rich due to the slow increase in difficulty.
The good days came to an end mid August with an unprecedented 35% increase in difficulty. This is due to existing manufacturers selling more hardware and many other players coming onto the market with better hardware (smaller die). Since die shrinking knowledge and manufacturing process are well known along with a large technological gap (110nm vs 22nm), you get an arms race. Current ASIC makers are closing in on our technological limit and until everyone catches up, the difficulty jumps will be high because it is just too easy to get a performance increase. Most newer products run at 28nm and most chips are not well optimized, so it will be around another 6 to 9 months before we see hit a hard plateau with 22nm or 14nm chips. The estimated time frame is because manufacturing chips at 22nm or 14nm is a more difficult and expensive task. In the meantime most manufacturers will probably settle at 28nm and we will reach a soft plateau in about 3 months.
Now, you might ask these questions and should have them answered and if you have not thought about them at all, then you probably should not touch bitcoin until you understand cause you are highly unprepared and probably lose lots of money.
No. If you have to ask, please do not touch bitcoin yet. You will spend more on electricity cost than mining any substantial bitcoin. Seriously. At all. A 7990 would produce a pitiful 0.02879 XBT (USD $14 @ $500/XBT exchange rate) for the next 30 days starting 23 Nov 2013 at 35% difficulty increase.
And if you think you can mine on your laptop either on a CPU or GPU, you are probably going to melt it before you even get 0.01 XBT.
Probably not because you probably forgot that GPUs and CPUs produce a ton of heat and noise. You can try but I see no point earning < $20 bucks per month.
No, because your machine will probably not mine as much as buying bitcoins. This situation is called the opportunity cost. While you can still make money if XBT rise in value, it is a fallacy.
IE: if you start mining on 1 Dec 2013, a KnC Jupiter running at 450Gh/sec (KnC lies as not all chips run at 550Gh/sec) will yield you a total revenue of 9.5189 XBT with a profit of 0.7859 XBT in profit by 30th Jan 2014 at a constant difficulty increase of 35%. The opportunity cost is: 8.5910 XBT @ USD $580/XBT with USD $5,000 which is the cost of a KnC Jupiter. This is the best you can earn and it's a bloody optimistic assumption because:
The only circumstances where you will earn money is when XBT exchange rates is so high that it makes the opportunity cost pales in comparison. Unfortunately this is not the case. If XBT stabilized at 900/XBT today (20 Nov 2013) then we might have a good case.
The risk is just generally not worth it. Unless you have at least a hundred thousand and can make a contract with a manufacturer for a lower cost, do not bother. Just wait until the arms race is over then you can start mining.
Okay, go buy an AsicMiner USB Block Erupter. They are cheap and pretty fun to have.
Sure, just read the answer below on who NOT to go for. You are doing bitcoin a service by securing the network and you have our (the users') gratitude.
You can check out the manufacturers and their products below along with a calculator here.
If you still insist on buying, do not to go for BFL. Their track record is horrid and borderline scammish. KnC fucked up a lot with defective boards and chips. Personally, I think CoinTerra is the best choice.
Alternatively, you can go on the secondary market to buy a delivered product. You can get a better deal there if you know how to do your "return on investment (ROI)" calculation. Personally, I will go for a 45%-50% difficulty increase for the next 3 months for my calculations and a 2% pool fee.
However, most products on ebay are sold at a cost much higher than it should. bitcointalk.org is a cheaper place because everyone knows what are the true value is so you will find less options. If you are unclear or need assistance, please post a question.
I actually do not use any of the pools recommended to the left because I think they lack features.
My favourite is Bitminter (Variable fees based on features used; max 2%). It has all advanced features for a pool, very responsive and helpful owner on IRC. Variable fees is good for those who do not need a large feature set, even with all features turned on, it is still cheap.
Eligius (0% fees) has high value for money but lacks features. It has anonymous mining which might be attractive to certain subset of people but not for others. Many other community member and I disagree highly with the opinions of the owner on the direction of bitcoin. I do use his pool for now but I do so only because I share my miners with a few partners and anonymous mining allows us to monitor the machines without using an account. Bitminter uses only OpenID which is problematic for me.
BTC Guild (3% fees) is another big pool and is fully featured and does charge a premium for their fees. That said, they are the most stable of the lot. I do use them but do so only because my hoster uses them for monitoring. I try not to use them because a pool with a very large hash rate (they are the largest) presents a large vulnerability to bitcoin's network if compromised.
All of them pay out transaction fees.
submitted by Coz131 to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

5 AntMiner S1's for my home mining rig?

Sometime mid next week (Jan 19-21) I should have ~$5,000-6,000 in PayPal. I am looking to buy 5 S1's direct from BitMain.
I've got a few questions/concerns however.
The biggest concern right now is being able to buy $5,000 of bitcoin, using PayPal. I'm 16, so withdrawing all that money to my student checking account is a no-go. My mom also doesn't want to give PayPal her tax ID, and credit card so she has unlimited withdrawing capabilities. I plan on asking around the Chicago Bitcoin Meetup if anyone there would be able to sell me that much Bitcoin, and for PayPal or something along those lines.
After I get the bitcoins, and the S1's delivered, any advice on keeping them cool, and clean? They'll probably go in my basement, and I'm thinking about some kind of horizontal rack, and cooling system. I'd like to overclock them to 208 gh/s. One of my friends has built a LN2 creator before, and was talking to me about possibly doing this for all my BTC miners, so we could further overclock them, increasing profitability.
I'd expect some kind of decent ROI with this setup, and yes current profiribility calculators will probably tell you I won't make much, but I'm gonna go out on a limb and assume Bitcoins will be at, or over $1,000 a pop by SeptembeOctober of 2014.
I also plan on using Coinwarz and mine the most profitable coin each day, and sell via cryptsy. I'll also just save some bitcoins for the future.
What kind of PSU's should I get for 5 of these bad-boys? Would 2 1050w PSU's and then another 700w one be alright?
My friend, who bought an Avalon Asic Batch 2 last year for ~$1,500 made a great ROI, and he is doing the same exact thing I am with this project. Except that he might end up with 10 S1's, while I'll have 5 of them.
If anyone has any advice for me, I'd love to hear it. I've been following Bitcoin very heavily sense I first herd about it in 2008 (It was only $2 a pop when I just went on #otc) but this will be my very first mining rig of my own. I've mined of my GPU/CPU using various coins, along with my usb asic, but this will be a large project/rig.
submitted by llanox to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

This is my understanding of the current state of BitMining, how far off am I? What would you recommend for a new miner with a bit of cash?

I'm newish to bitcoin and mining in general but this is what I've figured out so far, am i close?
If Butterfly labs does ship; or if Avalon does a 4th batch, and either option takes 2-3 months to ship and arrive at the door, would it be too late for new miners to jump on the ASIC bandwagon? I seems like mining is a race to get the newest equipment first and cashing out the initial investment early.
Is this a good summary of the current state of bit mining, or am i completely off?
I'm looking at getting into mining; however i feel like I'm so far behind the ASIC wagon that if i did get a ASIC system, it would take a long time to break even and "the next best thing" might be out by then?
If it makes sense and will have a decent break even point (60-90days) I have about $1800 i can invest in mining from selling some stocks that have been stagnant for a few months. What would you guys suggest?
submitted by eoJmIiH to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

Frequently Asked Question: What's an ASIC, FPGA?

So you're sick of just mining on your GPU, and not a fan of the electric bill after a month of mining? There has to be a better option out there than your loud GPU in your gaming computer. There is!
Shortly after GPUs became popular for bitcoin mining, enterprising folks started looking at other things they can re-purpose to mine bitcoins more efficiently. Around mid-year 2011, the first devices sprang up that are called FPGAs or Field Programmable Gate Arrays. These are nothing new to the hobbyist community, they've been around for a while for crackers and other security-conscious folks looking at ways to defeat cryptographic locks. Hey! I know something that uses cryptographic calculations to secure its network! BITCOINS! Yep, so some miners developed their own boards and slapped some FPGA chips on them (most commonly the Spartan-6), and wrote specific firmware and "bitstreams" to more efficiently calculate bitcoin hashes. The first generations were sort of slow, but still they had better efficiency than a GPU. Some of the latest generation included the Icarus boards, Cairnsmore, x6500, and ModMiner Quad.
In early 2012(i think my timeline is right), Butterfly Labs(BFL) was selling their own FPGA miner that hashed at 800 Mhash/s using 80 watts and only cost US$600 amazing! These grew very popular, but people could see that FPGAs still weren't the most efficient way to hash their shares. BFL then announced that they would be designing their own chips that would be orders of magnitude faster than anything ever seen. These would be the ASICs (or Application Specific Integrated Circuit)everyone is raving about. ASICs are--as the name implies--specifically designed for one thing, and one thing only. Bitcoins. This is all it can do, and can't really be repurposed like an FPGA to other applications. Who wouldn't want a US$150 "Jalapeno" that hashes at 3.5 GIGAhashes/s using only power from a USB port?? Crazy! So summer 2012, BFL says they will ship before Christmas. Various things happen and we now still don't have any confirmed ship dates from BFL.
A few other companies have sprouted up, ASICminer which I believe is developing their own chips to mine themselves, but in a responsible way as to not threaten the network with a sudden influx of hashing. bASIC was a fiasco that was developed by the creator of the ModMiner Quad(which is actually a fantastic miner, I own one, and love it.) where he took many preorders, promised lots of people amazing ASIC performance, but in early 2013 the stress of the whole endeavour got to him and he gave up, refunded money(I think it's still being refunded now, or maybe it's been cleared up already.)
Avalon is the only company we know has ASIC mining hardware in the wild. It is not certain exactly how many are out there, but they have been confirmed by independent sources. The Avalon units are expensive(75 BTC) and have been in limited production runs (or batches) of a few hundred units that were pre-sold out very quickly.
All of this info is gleaned from the Custom Hardware forum over at bitcointalk.org over the past year or so I've been involved in bitcoin. I may have some facts wrong, but this is the gist of the situation and hopefully gives you an insight on the state of the hardware war against bitcoin
Thanks for reading!
submitted by purelithium to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

Difficulty estimation?

I am thinking about investing in a bitcoin ASIC miner and I have some questions about difficulty. I realize that the difficulty skyrockets once BFL and the third Avalon ASIC batch ships. The question is just how high exactly will it go. Is there a way to very roughly estimate how high it will be in August assuming all BFL products have sipped by then?
submitted by 00vitality00 to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

Hypothetical: What happens if Avalon's chips all stopped working at once?

Apparently the Avalon ASIC company has recently sold over 500,000 individual 282MH/s chips ready to be fabricated into various miners. They just sold two more batches of 10,000 chips today.
That's 141 Tera Hashes of mining power, or about 3 times the power of the entire Bitcoin network at the moment. Woohoo! Security for all!
Now imagine this scenario...
We're all chugging along mining bitcoins on our sweet new home-built ASICs. We quadruple the current difficulty. The network is more secure than ever and we couldn't be happier.
Right then, somebody notices a chink in the armor.
"[email protected]#! My DIY Avalon Board Isn't Responding!!!!!" reads the bitcointalk forum post.
By nightfall, there are hundreds of similarly worded posts.
Nobody knows what the problem is, and nobody will until a few more days of investigation.
All we know is that blocks are taking longer and longer to mine, the value of Bitcoin is plummeting, and that we shouldn't have placed all of our eggs in one basket.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IPLnYP9Oo8s
submitted by bitchan to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Some pieces I cannot put together

I've been reading extensively on bitcoin for the past few days and there are a few holes here and there that I'm trying to understand. So far it makes me believe that this whole mining thing is some sort of elaborated scam. Here is a few unorganized points that are confusing to me.
Why are other currencies like litecoin slowly becoming popular and why people want them to become popular? What purpose do litecoin serves that bitcoin doesn't? If the second to bitcoin, a redundant currency like litecoin becomes popular and that people want it to become popular, then what's stop more of those currencies to all becoming popular making each of them just spammy/redundant at the end, don't we only need one of those currencies to serve the purpose of worldwide decentered transactions?
The so popular and referred mining hardware comparison sheet gives a list of videocard that are recommended to use. Combined with this calculator people can make some calculations to see if they should invest electricity cost into mining.
Now it seems to yield a little free income at the end of the month, all seems well until you investigate further. The power consumption of your videocard shown there is, in the radeon 6850 case, only half of what it truly use at full usage.
Now to add to this, I've been mining for more than a day at full power without stopping nor interfering in the process. It tells me I should be making 0.0125 bitcoin a day but I barely made half of that in a bit more than a day, yet I am positive the videocard ran at full strength for the whole process.
Now, double electricity cost vs half production, it becomes almost a profitless operation. To this, combined that the current bitcoin value is tenfold what it was 3 months ago, how could it have been profitable back then if it is not right now?
Now another suspicious part to me is those 2 websites 1 2. They offer what every person would ever want, a way to make a lot of money easily.
Both of them deliver their products months after purchase and, the 2nd website especially, is selling something that would potentially pays for itself back in less than a month, after which huge profit would come in. How convenient, to sell something that yields huge profit and pays itself back so quickly, better sell than use ourselves right?
The first site has sold out, and funnily enough are selling the next batch for 75 bitcoin per... which they could just mine themselves faster than their delivery time, so what's their gain really? Conveniently we have the 2nd website, not sold out, selling something similar to the 1st website, without any pictures of what the behind of their miner looks like, who won't mention anywhere the power consumption of their product but say that it comes with a usb cord, plug and play!
That sure not sound fishy at all since the asic counterpart is shown on the comparison sheet as using 600 W, for sure the usb connector hole can output that kind of power right?
Hopefully someone can shed some light on all this to the better understanding of least common asked matters, yet quite important for anyone who wants to jump in this... bandwagon...
I'm legitimately trying to see things optimistically but so far I only see a few root members trying to scam the entire world by projecting this half legit currency world unto us.
Note: sorry for my relatively poor english, I tried putting my thoughts into word as precisely as I could, but I couldn't do it as well as I wish I could.
submitted by StupidButSerious to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Group Buy Europe [Nederland] - Avalon chips

Here another European order from: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=188768.0
Group Buy Europe [Nederland] Today at 02:01:27 AM #1 Group Buy Europe [Nederland]
updated: 27th of April
I. Group Buy Information
We will order 1 batch (10,000) chips from Avalon at a cost of 780 BTC
Product description:
the only payment accepted is Bitcoin. the chips being sold are packaged and tested. the lead time on the chips is 9 to 10 weeks. made to order from TSMC foundry and then packaged and shipped. the minimum order quantity is 10,000 chips and the maximum order quantity is 200,000. the chips are identical to those in Avalon, clocking 282Mh/s per chip. the password is “I understand and agree”. communication protocol, reference board design provided in early May. everything will be open source from FPGA to PCB design. we do not offer technical support of any kind, this is final. if you do not know what to do with the packaged chips, please do not purchase.
http://store.avalon-asics.com/?product=avalon-asic-chips-10000
II. Why another group buy ?
zefir and ragingazn628 offer a great deal, but I am convinced it will take them some time to ship all their orders, besides this I think burnin and new-asics well be very busy with assembling ASICS. Thus alternatives and decentralization would be very useful to many miners.
III. Price
10,000 chips (excl. shipping) cost 780 BTC => 1 chips = 0.078 BTC
As I am going to import as a private person I assume import tax to the Netherlands will be 21 % (I know it sucks).
21 % of 780 BTC = 163.8 BTC
Total Costs: 943.8 BTC
To make it easier and to pay for my effort and expenses I will charge 0.1 BTC per chip. (0.09438 chip costs + import taxes, 0.00562 fee)
Avalon chips 780 BTC 21 % tax 163.8 BTC Fee: 56.2 BTC Total: 1000 BTC
IV. Shipping
You will have two options, you can personally pick up your order in the following locations:
Brussels Amsterdam (evtl. I will add another city, if there is a demand)
or we will organize shipping via DHL, UPS (you will have to pay shipping fee)
V. Please post following information in this thread:
N Number of chips B Bitcoins transfered Bitcoin address Forum nickname
Example: 200, 20,3594ter9ffwejiergij31sdsfd, MasterBoy89
Please only send your Bitcoins with a wallet you control !
You rather can send your BTC directly to this address: 1L79nCEzcPRFFKTk59QBRfgWDvgg75hDwr
but if you're more comfortable we also can use escrow.
VI. Trust
Why should you trust me ? I don't know, but if you want to meet me I will be at the Bitcoin meeting in Driebergen on May 3rd, where we can discuss and you can ask me nearly any question.
VII. Assembly
I guess burnin/Neo-asics will be very busy thus the plan would be to build our own community assembler team. Preferably located in the BeNeLux. Anyone interest in taking the lead ?
submitted by Bibo7 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: top posts from 2013-05-02 to 2013-06-01 00:16 PDT

Period: 29.56 days
Submissions % Comments %
Total 1000 47511
Rate (per day) 33.84 1522.53
Unique Redditors 658 6162
Upvotes 117878 81% 229648 76%
Downvotes 26426 19% 69920 24%

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 2205 pts, 37 submissions: IWillNotBiteYourDog
    1. Thank You, Bitcoin Community | Electronic Frontier Foundation (245 pts, 33 comments)
    2. How 23-year-old Charlie Shrem became a millionaire through Bitcoin (224 pts, 266 comments)
    3. With $1.5M Led By Winklevoss Capital, BitInstant Aims To Be The Go-To Site To Buy And Sell Bitcoins (140 pts, 49 comments)
    4. Bitcoin now outguns all of Earth's supercomputers (132 pts, 53 comments)
    5. Why I Invested in Bitcoin - the Perfect Schmuck Insurance (128 pts, 53 comments)
    6. Should You Trade Bitcoin? An Expert View (106 pts, 88 comments)
    7. Why PayPal is bullish on Bitcoin (81 pts, 34 comments)
    8. [scam alert] Startup Company Cryoniks Ramping Up Production of its 1000 GH/s Bitmining Solution (76 pts, 11 comments)
    9. Government Will Be As Successful At Regulating Bitcoin As Its Been With File Sharing (73 pts, 38 comments)
    10. $1 billion in bitcoin was traded in April—16 times the previous record (69 pts, 3 comments)
  2. 1867 pts, 20 submissions: waspoza
    1. Coinbase Nabs $5M in Biggest Funding for Bitcoin Startup - WSJ (262 pts, 57 comments)
    2. Why Bitcoin will succeed - MarketWatch (226 pts, 136 comments)
    3. The Most Important Early-Stage Investor Of The Last 10 Years Just Made A Huge Bet On Bitcoin (224 pts, 27 comments)
    4. Why won’t Bitcoin die? (220 pts, 97 comments)
    5. Bitcoin will continue to function beyond the reach of government and law (177 pts, 40 comments)
    6. Peter Thiel & Founders Fund lead $2m funding round in BitPay (141 pts, 13 comments)
    7. Your Bitcoins Are Finally Worth Something | TechCrunch (127 pts, 107 comments)
    8. Bitcoin has a good shot at being the currency of the future (60 pts, 20 comments)
    9. A Hungarian company is about to launch an enterprise-class software product designed to make it easy for businesses to create bitcoin-enabled applications (60 pts, 1 comments)
    10. Bitcoin finding its feet at first Silicon Valley conference (54 pts, 1 comments)
  3. 1484 pts, 9 submissions: elux
    1. Bill Gates: "[Bitcoin] is a techno tour de force." Charlie Munger: "I think it's rat poison." Warren Buffett: "I think either Charlie or Bill is right." (669 pts, 348 comments)
    2. Bitcoin: This article is ranked 35 in traffic on en.wikipedia.org (365 pts, 43 comments)
    3. Three Million Milestone (163 pts, 31 comments)
    4. WSJ: The Weekend Interview With Gavin Andresen - Bitcoin vs. Ben Bernanke (89 pts, 19 comments)
    5. CNET | Winklevoss twins on Bitcoin: "Time to work with the Feds." (78 pts, 103 comments)
    6. LA Times: Bitcoin concept is gaining currency (42 pts, 5 comments)
    7. Avalon ASIC Batch #2 Unboxing (38 pts, 15 comments)
    8. Bitcoin Fund aims to make bitcoin investing easy (22 pts, 4 comments)
    9. BitcoinATM Presentation: The Demo (18 pts, 3 comments)
  4. 1379 pts, 3 submissions: circuitry
    1. ASICMiner USB mining farm (727 pts, 272 comments)
    2. Seems legit. (618 pts, 148 comments)
    3. ASICMiner's "official unofficial" Excel sheet has been updated with an estimated weekly pay-per-share column. It looks good. (34 pts, 24 comments)
  5. 1377 pts, 1 submissions: im14
    1. Thanks for bringing # of votes for Dropbox Bitcoin acceptance from 3,500 to 7,200, Reddit! However, we need at least 16,000 to get to first page! Please vote if you haven't done so yet. Thanks! (1377 pts, 121 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. ferroh (1674 pts, 340 comments)
  2. btchombre (1161 pts, 130 comments)
  3. theymos (1107 pts, 93 comments)
  4. throwaway-o (970 pts, 245 comments)
  5. 7trXMk6Z (921 pts, 256 comments)
  6. bitcointip (883 pts, 361 comments)
  7. TheSelfGoverned (804 pts, 254 comments)
  8. Lentil-Soup (721 pts, 269 comments)
  9. bitfan2013 (669 pts, 132 comments)
  10. ELeeMacFall (643 pts, 220 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. Thanks for bringing # of votes for Dropbox Bitcoin acceptance from 3,500 to 7,200, Reddit! However, we need at least 16,000 to get to first page! Please vote if you haven't done so yet. Thanks! by im14 (1377 pts, 121 comments)
  2. Dwolla no longer allowed to do business with MtGox! by Rassah (863 pts, 863 comments)
  3. PayPal shut my account down for giving away free bitcoins with purchases. by NikolaiRimskyK (847 pts, 171 comments)
  4. ASICMiner USB mining farm by circuitry (727 pts, 272 comments)
  5. Update: Over 6000 Fed by SeansOutpost (708 pts, 112 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 221 pts: hollando's comment in Dwolla no longer allowed to do business with MtGox!
  2. 218 pts: vuce's comment in Guys, really... Chill out.
  3. 154 pts: cunnl01's comment in My miner!
  4. 144 pts: gavinandresen's comment in Thank you Gavin!
  5. 144 pts: deleted's comment in Bill Gates: "[Bitcoin] is a techno tour de force." Charlie Munger: "I think it's rat poison." Warren Buffett: "I think either Charlie or Bill is right."
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats SRS Marker: 1370070984.0
submitted by subreddit_stats to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Announcing - MineNinja BeagleBone Bitcoin Mining Platform

Open Source startup CoinNinja (www.coinninja.com) launches its first product geared for miners of the Bitcoin crypto-currency. The MineNinja is a turn-key device for hosting Bitcoin mining hardware, such as ASICs from Butterfly Labs, Avalon, and ASICMiner. With the bitcoin mining market rapidly moving to ASIC devices which provide more Hash power per watt, the MineNinja is the perfect compliment as it further reduces power consumption by eliminating the need for a PC.
"We chose the BeagleBone Black over the Raspberry Pi as it is truly open source. The BeagleBone design is totally open, and that cannot be said about the Pi. Furthermore we found the BeagleBone to be far more reliable, and operating temperatures to be significantly lower.”
Leveraging the power of Open Source development, the MineNinja is a great example of the Maker revolution for innovative small business. The MineNinja is small batch manufactured using the Open Source BeagleBone Black from Texas Instruments and its enclosure is 3D printed on an open source RepRap 3d Printer. The MineNinja is so low-power that it can easily be powered using only a USB port.
"We believe in the Open Source movement, all of our hardware and software is fully open source. We encourage users to make their own MineNinja, everything needed to make your own be easily found in our Github repositiory." - states Alessandro Nardella, Lead Developer at CoinNinja.
The MineNinja leverages existing open source software such as Angstrom Linux, Cgminer and the ANUBIS web front-end to Cgminer. The MineNinja uses the BeagleBone Black without any hardware modifications, which allows users to further refine the product by adding their unique contributions.
The MineNinja BeagleBone Bitcoin miner is available today in limited quantities at www.mineninja.com.
submitted by Coinninja to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

MintForge.com Avalon ASIC Bitcoin Miner 230 GH/s makes $70/day Avalon6 (bitcoin asic miner) x2 items: draw 1622W at 300 Chip Max Frequency Avalon 2 ASIC Bitcoin Miner Avalon ASIC server Bitcoin Avalon ASIC Batch #2 Unboxing

Amazon.com : AVALON ASIC 80GH/s Bitcoin Miner (Batch 2) : Other Products : Everything Else. Skip to main content. Try Prime All Go Search EN Hello, Sign in Account & Lists Sign in Account ... 1 x Bitmain Antminer U2 bis 2,2 GH/s USB Bitcoin Miner Asic SHA256 mit OVP. EUR 75,00. Lieferung an Abholstation. EUR 4,50 Versand. Produktart: Bitcoin Miner . oder Preisvorschlag. 6 Beobachter. Antminer Z11 135+KSol/s with PSU - Ships Next Day. EUR 1.479,00. Aus Österreich. EUR 50,00 Versand. Produktart: Bitcoin Miner. oder Preisvorschlag. Bitmain Antminer D3 (19.3Gh) EUR 120,00. Abholung ... Alibaba.com offers 169 avalon 2 asic products. such as > 1000w, 901w - 1000w. Generate bitcoin with Bitcoin miner pro 2018 V 3.2 generate has been published after epic three weeks beta testing, which ended with great success. This tool will NOT let you down. All features are included and described in notes.txt file which you will get with installation file. Generate bitcoin with Bitcoin miner p A typical Bitcoin miner from Bitmain comes at a price of around $1,100.The one interesting thing about Bitmain miners is that they come with a three month warranty. Depending upon the model that you choose, the hash rate of the miner varies from 8 to 14 TH/s. Each model has its own efficiency and depending on that, the profitability of the ASIC miners also varies. There have been reports where ...

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MintForge.com Avalon ASIC Bitcoin Miner 230 GH/s makes $70/day

Demo of MintForge.com Avalon ASIC Bitcoin Miner 230 GH/s makes $70/day By Rezilient Company LLC This miner is a batch 2 Avalon Bitcoin Miner. It's been running at around 80ghs since the firmware upgrade, using --avalon-auto. Currently on Ebay at It's been running at around 80ghs since the ... Made a short video to show how loud this system is. Very good airflow and the ASIC's are staying around 56 degrees C PCB for DIY - Bitcoin Miner on ASIC 16 chips Avalon 2 gen A3255-Q48 - total performance 26 GHs! Price 1pcs prive - $19/PCB, more 10pcs - $10/PCB Economy Shipping Worldwide - $7.99 Expedited ... check power consumption and noise of the 2 running Avalon 6 (bitcoin ASIC miner) controlled by 1 Raspberry pi.

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